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Blog Talk Radio: A Reader’s Dream

2 Apr

Looking for a good book? Blog Talk Radio is where readers and writers listen and connect. Listen as authors talk about their new creations and where readers can ask questions about their favorite characters.

Channels on Blog Talk Radio that may interest you:

  • Library Love Fest – Lively conversations for librarians
  • Romance Radio – Best authors in romance
  • The Beyond – Science Fiction authors and books
  • Book Girl Club – Book clubs from around the world
  • Top Shelf – Top selling authors are interviewed

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/

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Current.com – WebTV?

11 Nov

Looking for a way to stay on top of current events? No matter what you’re into whether it be music, comedy, politics, TV, art, style, or romance, current.com has the latest news you are looking for.

Current.com is an online TV station built by you. This website presents short video clips that give a clear sense of what is happening in popular culture. This site takes updating their content seriously and they are constantly uploading new clips. Current also turns to their users upload to original material too.

What I Like: They gave a face to the website by introducing news host Douglas Cabellero; he keeps you on top of the latest trends at Current.com. My favorite section is their hall of fame; it boasts the all-time best clips.

Will you give this a try or stick to YouTube?
http://www.current.com

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The End of the Telegram?

20 Feb

The world’s first telegram was sent on May 24, 1844 by inventor Samuel Morse. The last telegram was just sent last month on January 27, 2006 by Western Union; they decided to discontinue all Telegram and Commercial Messaging services. If you are not familiar with the telegram, you are not alone. Over the last 10 years, the popularity of the telegram has been a one-way course with disaster. Forms of electronic communication such as email, fax, instant messaging and text messaging have made the telegram obsolete.

Imagine you want to send a message and you want to get it to someone quick. Sixty years ago, the elite way to send a message was to call Western Union and their agent would transcribe and then hand delivers your message to your recipient. If you watch any movie from the 1950s, there was always a scene where a delivery boy would interrupt shouting, “Telegram, Telegram… I have a Telegram for Mr. Smith.” This mode of communication signified a certain amount of urgency and class. It was a way of life.

The death of the Telegram signifies the end of an era. This is the end of a simpler time where a sending a message took hours instead of seconds. Western Union said, “The significant decline in its use prompted us to stop the service.” Personally, I think the telegram will still live in some form. I mean Eastern Onion is still delivering the singing telegram. In the age of digital music, there still are LPs released on vinyl. Morse code was a form of communication that was popular in the 1950s but is still used by the military. CBs were extremely popular in the 1970s and even with the proliferation of cell phones, the trucking industry is still using them. The telegram will live on in some form; it?s not over until the fat lady sings.

History of telegram

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Uncensored Satellite Radio

18 Sep

I was listening to the Howard Stern show the other day and a listener called-in asking Howard how she could listen to the show with her kids in the car when he switches over to Sirus radio. For everyone who is not a Howard Stern fan, the proclaimed king of all media will be leaving terrestrial radio (FM) and moving to Satellite Radio in a couple of months. In a nutshell, what this means is that his crass brand of humor will now be uncensored on satellite.

The caller went on to explain that right now she has two DVD Players in the back of the car that keep her children occupied while she can pan his show upfront for her ears only. The soccer mom Stern fan was concerned that she would be unable to listen anymore because the show will now be uncensored. Howard remarked that she should just continue to do what she is doing now; there is no reason to change her parental controls when he goes over to Sirus. He also stated his standard reply, “Turn it off if you don’t like it.”

If you are a Stern fan, you want to continue to listen to the show, you feel compelled to listen to the show with your children in the car even though there is uncensored content, then think about this question. If you are going to be paying for the Sirus service, $19.95 a month, and shelling out hundreds for the device, won’t it be more difficult for you to turn it off? Will it also to be difficult to keep on in the background at work? How will the era of popular uncensored entertainment be dealt with? As the technology increases in popularity, these questions will come more to the forefront. Even though the FCC doesn’t monitor paid entertainment, will their long arm eventually transcend this media?

Once again with all this new technology, we have more choices of entertainment, but that just means we have more choices that children can be exposed to as well. Are you ready for uncensored satellite radio?

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